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Press Release Press Release Press Release Press  Release   

 

12 October 2005        

 

 

CLEARER LABELLING OF FOOD PRODUCTS WILL HELP CUT

SALT INTAKE, SAYS AMICUS/CPHVA
Backing for Food Standards Agency’s campaign

Clearer labelling is needed so consumers know how much salt is in the food products they buy, says the Community Practitioners’ and Health Visitors’ Association (CPHVA).

Amicus/CPHVA is backing the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) campaign to reduce the amount of salt consumed by encouraging people to check food labels and eat no more than 6g – about a teaspoonful - of salt a day.

Obi Amadi, the Lead Professional Officer (Health Visiting) for Amicus/CPHVA said: 'We support the campaign by the FSA. An excessive intake of salt contributes to factors such as high blood pressure that, in turn, can result in heart attacks.’

‘Clear labelling of all foods is essential so that consumers know exactly what they are purchasing. Diet is the bedrock for good health - and too much salt is detrimental to a healthy way of life.’

‘Community practitioners are at the forefront of promoting sensible eating and drinking with the populations that they work with.'

New FSA research shows that 22 million people are now trying to cut down the amount of salt they eat - an increase of nearly six million since September 2004.

But two out of three people do not know that they should be eating no more than 6g of salt a day, and only a third of adults are looking at labels for the salt content.

Public Health Minister, Caroline Flint said that reducing salt intake is a priority for government: ‘We will continue to work closely with the food industry to reduce the salt content of processed foods.’

The FSA has launched a television and poster advertising campaign by using animated ready meals to illustrate to consumers that by comparing labels and choosing products with the lower salt content, they can control how much salt they eat with the aim of eating no more than 6g per day.

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NOTE TO NEWS EDITORS

The CPHVA is supporting Netmums campaign to reduce the stigma of postnatal depression and campaigning nationally to stop the cuts in health visitor numbers. Health visitors are the professionals best placed to pick up mothers with postnatal depression early and to ensure that they receive appropriate help.

For further information, please ring:

Shaun Noble, Communications Officer (020) 7780 4080
mobile ( 07768 69 39 40

CPHVA press releases can be seen on the CPHVA website: amicus-cphva.org


Amicus Health has about 100,000 professional and skilled members working in the health sector. Its professional sections include the Community Practitioners’ and Health Visitors’ Association, the Mental Health Nurses’ Association, the Guild of Healthcare Pharmacists, the Society of Sexual Health Advisers, and the Medical Practitioners’ Union.

 

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