Community Practitioners' and Health Visitors' Association

Back to home pageGeneral information about CPHVAMembership information Contact CPHVA staffSearch CPHVA site for general informationHelp on navigating the siteLinks to other useful sitesEnter members' area

Health visiting information
School nursing information District nursing information Practice nursing information Countries-Scotland, Wales and Northern IrelandPublic health information Clinical effectiveness information Courses, grants and reportsCPHVA responses to government and other reportsCPHVA and non-CPHVA eventsPress releases and media relationsCPHVA campaignsSpecial Interest GroupsFrequently asked questionsIndex to site
Amicustheunion

 

Weight control linked to impact of quitting smoking

Ex-smokers need to watch their weight to receive the maximum impact of stopping smoking, new research has found.

A study by researchers at King's College London, published in this week's Lancet medical journal, states that smoking causes lung function to prematurely decline and while quitting smoking has a beneficial effect on the lungs, it can lead to weight increases.

Weight gain reduces the benefits of stopping smoking and recent quitters are the most likely group to gain weight after quitting, the study states.

"Our data suggest that quitting smoking is beneficial for lung health, but weight gain is an important factor in reducing the beneficial effects of quitting on lung function in men, and that interventions to reduce this weight gain might be warranted," said Susan Chinn from King's College London.

A gender gap was discovered by the researchers, with increased weight reducing the benefit of quitting by 38 per cent for men and just 17 per cent for women.

The findings were supported by Ian Wilmore of Action on Health and Smoking , who told the BBC: "This makes a lot of sense and it is always a good idea to give up smoking under medical supervision."

For more information visit: http://www.thelancet.com/Weight control linked to impact of quitting smoking

Ex-smokers need to watch their weight to receive the maximum impact of stopping smoking, new research has found.

A study by researchers at King's College London, published in this week's Lancet medical journal, states that smoking causes lung function to prematurely decline and while quitting smoking has a beneficial effect on the lungs, it can lead to weight increases.

Weight gain reduces the benefits of stopping smoking and recent quitters are the most likely group to gain weight after quitting, the study states.

"Our data suggest that quitting smoking is beneficial for lung health, but weight gain is an important factor in reducing the beneficial effects of quitting on lung function in men, and that interventions to reduce this weight gain might be warranted," said Susan Chinn from King's College London.

A gender gap was discovered by the researchers, with increased weight reducing the benefit of quitting by 38 per cent for men and just 17 per cent for women.

The findings were supported by Ian Wilmore of Action on Health and Smoking , who told the BBC: "This makes a lot of sense and it is always a good idea to give up smoking under medical supervision."

For more information visit: http://www.thelancet.com/

 

(c) 1998-2004 DeHavilland Information Services plc. All rights reserved.

Top